Living the Dream: The GJ Interview with TR

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Think 1982. A lot was going on back then. Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands and Maldives, Israeli forces invaded Lebanon, and two hours away from the beach in So Cal the young Reyes Family gave birth to a baby boy and named him Timmy.

Ghetto Juice Editor Skip Snead recently chatted with the former ASP World Tour surfer turned Pacific Northwest surf tripper, and here's how some of the conversation went….

GJ: You’ve been all over the place this past year …. What have you been up to? Where you been?
Tim Reyes: Yeah, I’ve been doing a lot of Canada lately. My pops lives in Oregon. I have friends in Washington, I have friends throughout the whole west coast, and so I really enjoy surfing the whole West Coast. If you go and experience another break and try to make it home for a month is a really fun thing. Surfing’s just a little bit of a piece of what I do. My whole story is just riding waves and meeting new people and searching different new areas. That’s what I’ve been doing the last four or five years and I’ve been having a really good time doing it and riding really good waves.

GJ: So you used to surf River Jetties a lot when you were a grom, huh?
TR: Yeah, yeah, definitely Newland Street and River Jetties were the two main waves I surfed. I didn’t really like the pier. The pier, like for a grom, was a lot farther out there and a lot more current, so it was more intimidating. Plus there were more people so it was really intimidating. (laughs)

GJ: What kind of kid were you before you got into surfing?
TR: Before surfing I rode dirt bikes and, I don’t know, I did everything. BMX, dirt bike, and baseball. I was really good at baseball, but when we moved to the beach from San Bernardino, that’s where I came from, when I was eight years old, I started surfing a lot more. We lived in the trailer park right there off Newland Street and PCH … we lived in this sick little house. It was pretty rad. We could ride our bikes to the beach in less than five minutes. As soon as I could cross the street alone I started going surfing a lot more, probably around 12 years old.

GJ: At what point did you realize you could make surfing a career?
TR: Um, I think when I was about 16 years old. One of my really good friends, Micah Byrne, was a really talented young surfer. I think he won seven national titles or more. I was a lot newer, because those guys were competing when they were like nine years old. I was actually a late bloomer (laughs), but not too late. I started beating some of my really good friends, guys who I looked up to in surfing, and we surfed together every single day, and Micah pushed me really hard.

GJ: Were they pushing you to be a pro? Were you coached at all?
TR: I don’t know how it all led up to anything. I kind of just winged it. I never really had a coach. I was always kind of just there. After school I thought I’d go and compete professionally, and a few years out of high school I qualified for the world tour.

GJ: Tell me a little bit about your folks…
TR: My parents were really young, 17 and 18 when they had me. They were young kids. My dad was bagging groceries and my mom was just out of high school probably trying to figure things out. We lived two hours from the beach. Two years later my sister came. Our family was never giving anything at all. They all worked hard.

GJ: How did you deal with their separation? Was it tough on you?
TR: Not really. I understood it a lot more because I was traveling a lot. I was 18 when they broke up. So for me I understood a lot more because I traveled a lot from the time I was 11 till I was 18 and I met a lot of other people, and other families. I knew it was acceptable. It was normal. And it’s better today now that they’ve found peace with another soul mate. I think that makes everyone happy.

GJ: What’s your best memory from being a kid?
TR: My best memories of being a kid, let’s see. Well, obviously, every kid loves the beach. But my best memories would be traveling to Mexico with my dad. Just him and I. I was probably about 11 or 12, as much as I can remember we traveled a lot down to Mexico together, going camping. I remember surfing San Miguel my very first time when I was a kid. I think I was 10 or 11 years old and it was the very first time I ever surfed a rocky reef right hand pointbreak. I wore Vans shoes and an O’Neill wetsuit.
GJ: Wait. You wore shoes surfing???
(Find out the answer to this and dozens more questions we asked him in the new issue of Ghetto Juice #25 hitting core surf shops starting January 9, 2014)

100% Bonus Tim Reyes Footage


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Inset photo at the top of the page courtesy Timmy Reyes via Instagram @


Posted by: Ghetto JuiceGhetto Juice at: 09 Jan 2014 17:26




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Think 1982. A lot was going on back then. Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands and Maldives, Israeli forces invaded Lebanon, and two hours away from the beach in So Cal the young Reyes Family gave birth to a baby boy and named him Timmy.

Ghetto Juice Editor Skip Snead recently chatted with the former ASP World Tour surfer turned Pacific Northwest surf tripper, and here's how some of the conversation went….

GJ: You’ve been all over the place this past year …. What have you been up to? Where you been?
Tim Reyes: Yeah, I’ve been doing a lot of Canada lately. My pops lives in Oregon. I have friends in Washington, I have friends throughout the whole west coast, and so I really enjoy surfing the whole West Coast. If you go and experience another break and try to make it home for a month is a really fun thing. Surfing’s just a little bit of a piece of what I do. My whole story is just riding waves and meeting new people and searching different new areas. That’s what I’ve been doing the last four or five years and I’ve been having a really good time doing it and riding really good waves.

GJ: So you used to surf River Jetties a lot when you were a grom, huh?
TR: Yeah, yeah, definitely Newland Street and River Jetties were the two main waves I surfed. I didn’t really like the pier. The pier, like for a grom, was a lot farther out there and a lot more current, so it was more intimidating. Plus there were more people so it was really intimidating. (laughs)

GJ: What kind of kid were you before you got into surfing?
TR: Before surfing I rode dirt bikes and, I don’t know, I did everything. BMX, dirt bike, and baseball. I was really good at baseball, but when we moved to the beach from San Bernardino, that’s where I came from, when I was eight years old, I started surfing a lot more. We lived in the trailer park right there off Newland Street and PCH … we lived in this sick little house. It was pretty rad. We could ride our bikes to the beach in less than five minutes. As soon as I could cross the street alone I started going surfing a lot more, probably around 12 years old.

GJ: At what point did you realize you could make surfing a career?
TR: Um, I think when I was about 16 years old. One of my really good friends, Micah Byrne, was a really talented young surfer. I think he won seven national titles or more. I was a lot newer, because those guys were competing when they were like nine years old. I was actually a late bloomer (laughs), but not too late. I started beating some of my really good friends, guys who I looked up to in surfing, and we surfed together every single day, and Micah pushed me really hard.

GJ: Were they pushing you to be a pro? Were you coached at all?
TR: I don’t know how it all led up to anything. I kind of just winged it. I never really had a coach. I was always kind of just there. After school I thought I’d go and compete professionally, and a few years out of high school I qualified for the world tour.

GJ: Tell me a little bit about your folks…
TR: My parents were really young, 17 and 18 when they had me. They were young kids. My dad was bagging groceries and my mom was just out of high school probably trying to figure things out. We lived two hours from the beach. Two years later my sister came. Our family was never giving anything at all. They all worked hard.

GJ: How did you deal with their separation? Was it tough on you?
TR: Not really. I understood it a lot more because I was traveling a lot. I was 18 when they broke up. So for me I understood a lot more because I traveled a lot from the time I was 11 till I was 18 and I met a lot of other people, and other families. I knew it was acceptable. It was normal. And it’s better today now that they’ve found peace with another soul mate. I think that makes everyone happy.

GJ: What’s your best memory from being a kid?
TR: My best memories of being a kid, let’s see. Well, obviously, every kid loves the beach. But my best memories would be traveling to Mexico with my dad. Just him and I. I was probably about 11 or 12, as much as I can remember we traveled a lot down to Mexico together, going camping. I remember surfing San Miguel my very first time when I was a kid. I think I was 10 or 11 years old and it was the very first time I ever surfed a rocky reef right hand pointbreak. I wore Vans shoes and an O’Neill wetsuit.
GJ: Wait. You wore shoes surfing???
(Find out the answer to this and dozens more questions we asked him in the new issue of Ghetto Juice #25 hitting core surf shops starting January 9, 2014)

100% Bonus Tim Reyes Footage


G
J
2
0
1
4

Inset photo at the top of the page courtesy Timmy Reyes via Instagram @

Image many-faces-of-tim-reyes.jpg