God Save Santa Cruz; Exchange Boards, Not Needles!!

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It is a sad situation for our sister Surf City up North, as Santa Cruz is going through some tough times. From crime to homelessness to a failed 'needle exchange program', locals are finding needles all over town, from the rivers and creeks, to the parks and playgrounds, all the way to the beach, with Cowell's Beach (the main beach for learning to surf, and the City's Junior Lifeguards Program) being the worse and ranked as the 2nd dirtiest beach in California. This must be stopped. Thank God big wave legend and aerial king Ken Skindog Collins is speaking up. And Skinny and other ocean lovers in Santa Cruz won't back down until they see some big changes including getting their beloved Cowell's Beach off the #2 Dirtiest Beach in California list and to stop their classic little surf town from turning into a toxic waste land….

During a recent Santa Cruz County Supervisor Meeting, Ken approached the open mic and gave them an earful. Here's what he told them……

"Good morning, Board, my name’s Kenneth Collins, local surfer, local businessman, local family man, 4th generation, my children are 5th generation.

"I was living in paradise a couple of years ago. I was blind, I didn’t know what was going on until Cowell’s Beach turned into a complete toxic junkie mess, and I noticed there were people down there when I was dropping my daughter off at Junior Guards but I didn’t really focus on it. I just focused on the good things.

"Then I’d find blood in the bathroom and needles on the ground, and I’m like, wow, dude, there’s a junkie over there, I didn’t realize how bad it was, until they found three tons of garbage and about 500 needles in a cave at Cowell’s Beach. That’s when I realized, I’m all whoa, what’s going on here, like that’s when I became aware. I became aware that our state beach is the dirtiest state beach in the state. Santa Cruz, Cowell’s Beach, right now is number 2 dirtiest beach in the state, and we accept it.

"So I started doing beach clean ups, and going up the riverlands. Wow. Talk about a wake up call. Every one of our waterways, every creek has tons and tons of garbage, and hundreds of needles, and bike chop shops.

"And then I realized, this is a serious issue that’s out of sight, out of mind, and no one really is addressing it. The city wants to say it’s not their problem, it’s the county. The county’s saying it’s the city or it’s the state. It’s a private property owner. You guys all need to come together with the city council and everybody else that needs to be involved to make that stop.

"The fact that I can go to Lighthouse Field and get a ticket for having my dog off the leash but there’s people camping out leaving needles and trash in the same field and no one’s bothering them, we have a problem. No one wants to address it. It’s a serious problem.

"People want to make it complicated. It’s not very complicated at all. Consider the possibility that all the people who are doing all these troubles have one thing in common - they’re addicts. There’s needles. I understand the whole needle concept of the exchange, slow down the disease process, anybody consider that they’re speeding up the addiction process which is another disease? That’s a fact that needs to be addressed.

"We’re giving away too many needles. It’s obvious. They’re everywhere. Everywhere. And I find out that not every city in the state has a needle exchange program. So consider the possibility that we might want to not have a needle exchange program for a year. Take a year off. Let this wildfire simmer out, put this fire out, snuff it, consider the possibility we could start it up next year, once everything kind of calms down, because this summer, it’s bad right now but this summer, it’s going to explode. It’s been exploding every year, crime, exploding, cars getting rifled, home invasion is getting more and more common, it’s not if it’s just when a good family in this community gets killed.

"I work, I’m invested 100% in this community, I have two homes, I’m not going anywhere, my children are in the school system. This is my town. I’m 100% invested, and I feel like my priority is down here [gesturing knee height], and somebody who’s a drug addict that’s invested zero money showing up here, they’re up here [gesturing a foot over his head], we got to make sure they’re not getting diseases. I mean, I’m sorry, I am a compassionate person but we need to stop this. We need to stop this madness now. Consider the possibility of shutting the needle exchange down."

What can you do from wherever you are? Complain to those who can make a difference. Call Nancy Gordon of the Santa Cruz Commission on the Environment and give her an earful at (831) 454-2355. Tell her "Skindog" sent ya.


Posted by: Ghetto JuiceGhetto Juice at: 15 Apr 2013 17:07




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It is a sad situation for our sister Surf City up North, as Santa Cruz is going through some tough times. From crime to homelessness to a failed 'needle exchange program', locals are finding needles all over town, from the rivers and creeks, to the parks and playgrounds, all the way to the beach, with Cowell's Beach (the main beach for learning to surf, and the City's Junior Lifeguards Program) being the worse and ranked as the 2nd dirtiest beach in California. This must be stopped. Thank God big wave legend and aerial king Ken Skindog Collins is speaking up. And Skinny and other ocean lovers in Santa Cruz won't back down until they see some big changes including getting their beloved Cowell's Beach off the #2 Dirtiest Beach in California list and to stop their classic little surf town from turning into a toxic waste land….

During a recent Santa Cruz County Supervisor Meeting, Ken approached the open mic and gave them an earful. Here's what he told them……

"Good morning, Board, my name’s Kenneth Collins, local surfer, local businessman, local family man, 4th generation, my children are 5th generation.

"I was living in paradise a couple of years ago. I was blind, I didn’t know what was going on until Cowell’s Beach turned into a complete toxic junkie mess, and I noticed there were people down there when I was dropping my daughter off at Junior Guards but I didn’t really focus on it. I just focused on the good things.

"Then I’d find blood in the bathroom and needles on the ground, and I’m like, wow, dude, there’s a junkie over there, I didn’t realize how bad it was, until they found three tons of garbage and about 500 needles in a cave at Cowell’s Beach. That’s when I realized, I’m all whoa, what’s going on here, like that’s when I became aware. I became aware that our state beach is the dirtiest state beach in the state. Santa Cruz, Cowell’s Beach, right now is number 2 dirtiest beach in the state, and we accept it.

"So I started doing beach clean ups, and going up the riverlands. Wow. Talk about a wake up call. Every one of our waterways, every creek has tons and tons of garbage, and hundreds of needles, and bike chop shops.

"And then I realized, this is a serious issue that’s out of sight, out of mind, and no one really is addressing it. The city wants to say it’s not their problem, it’s the county. The county’s saying it’s the city or it’s the state. It’s a private property owner. You guys all need to come together with the city council and everybody else that needs to be involved to make that stop.

"The fact that I can go to Lighthouse Field and get a ticket for having my dog off the leash but there’s people camping out leaving needles and trash in the same field and no one’s bothering them, we have a problem. No one wants to address it. It’s a serious problem.

"People want to make it complicated. It’s not very complicated at all. Consider the possibility that all the people who are doing all these troubles have one thing in common - they’re addicts. There’s needles. I understand the whole needle concept of the exchange, slow down the disease process, anybody consider that they’re speeding up the addiction process which is another disease? That’s a fact that needs to be addressed.

"We’re giving away too many needles. It’s obvious. They’re everywhere. Everywhere. And I find out that not every city in the state has a needle exchange program. So consider the possibility that we might want to not have a needle exchange program for a year. Take a year off. Let this wildfire simmer out, put this fire out, snuff it, consider the possibility we could start it up next year, once everything kind of calms down, because this summer, it’s bad right now but this summer, it’s going to explode. It’s been exploding every year, crime, exploding, cars getting rifled, home invasion is getting more and more common, it’s not if it’s just when a good family in this community gets killed.

"I work, I’m invested 100% in this community, I have two homes, I’m not going anywhere, my children are in the school system. This is my town. I’m 100% invested, and I feel like my priority is down here [gesturing knee height], and somebody who’s a drug addict that’s invested zero money showing up here, they’re up here [gesturing a foot over his head], we got to make sure they’re not getting diseases. I mean, I’m sorry, I am a compassionate person but we need to stop this. We need to stop this madness now. Consider the possibility of shutting the needle exchange down."

What can you do from wherever you are? Complain to those who can make a difference. Call Nancy Gordon of the Santa Cruz Commission on the Environment and give her an earful at (831) 454-2355. Tell her "Skindog" sent ya.

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