If You Surf, Never Stop: Thoughts by Dino Andino

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After Kolohe was born I had a rebirth of surfing success. When I was 30, I did really well and I won all the American stuff; the PSTAs, the WQS’s in Newport, the WQS’s in Virginia. I had a lot of competitive success later, but I had to because I had no other way to make money. It was gnarly. I was living paycheck to paycheck. If I would've been as smart and competitive and as sober at 18 as I was when I was 30, I would've been and could've been way better off. I spent a lot of money on stupid stuff and wasted a lot of time. And that’s the hard part. Sometimes you gotta learn on your own. Kolohe doesn’t spend his money on stupid stuff ….

I’ve been so blessed with my employers along the way. When I was doing the contests, say 25-30 years old, I was taking Kolohe with me everywhere. Then when I took a job with Oakley when he was 7 or 8, and he got good enough quick that they actually let me take him to Snapper (Rocks) every year, and boat trips and different things. And they were really cool to let him come with me and develop his skills while I did my job, so it was really really cool. And I had a lot of friends who were pro surfers, Shane Beschen, Andy Irons, all the guys would always be cruising at my house … so he’s always been immersed in the whole scene since a really young age. It’s been really cool.

For all the talent Kolohe has, he actually works a lot harder than people realize. He’s out there, more time in the water, he doesn’t party much. He might have a little party here and there, but he’s really focused and dedicated, and I think that’s what it comes down to. You see the separation in the paths. I think he was blessed with a huge amount of talent, though that was always apparent. But talent is only as good as it is without work, so if you combine the two, with dedication and hard work and sacrifice, with talent…. And now he knows he has to work even harder. The journey’s really just beginning for him, and I think he’s realizing that…

If Kolohe starts to get too cocky, or a little too arrogant, shit will happen to him. Like some people pay the piper down the line later, but Kolohe’s got a conscious, he feels it and it happens quick. No matter what when you’re 19 years old it’s really tough to keep a level head, and I’m really stoked he’s learning on his own to be humble… Kolohe’s got great friends around him, they’re a really great group of kids…. They don’t surf as much as him, which I think is a little bit of a bummer for him, cause he likes to surf a lot, and a lot of times, surfing alone ain’t that fun. But I tell him he’s got a purpose, and he has a vision. It’s hard to stay that frothed out when you start to look at other ways your life is going to take you….

Kolohe’s having fun. He’s on the world tour, he’s learning a lot. You know a while back he was injured for like three and a half months, and after an injury it takes a while to get back to normal, and I think, you know, he was a bit overzealous before the tour started that year, thinking he was gonna do certain things, and I think he got humbled, and learned a lot. I’m really proud of where he is mentally and physically right now. It’s a good time for him.

I just surfed Trestles with Kolohe the other day. It was unbelievable. I was really really stoked, cause there’s old school guys out there that were surfing there before me, and now my son’s surfing there with me, and you’re seeing fins, and upside down inverts, and big wraps going into the bay. It was a beautiful sunny day, you know, the water was glistening, and there were only like ten guys in the water. To be able to share that with my son is so cool, ‘cause there’s really nowhere like Lowers. You’d have to go to Northern California to experience that sort of vibe on the beach, and Kolohe has it five minutes from his house. I was telling him, ‘Dude, I told ya.” You know, the kids these days, they want a ramp, they want a closeout, and as soon as he realizes that if he waters that tree down there, the roots, and surfs down there, his surfing will go to another level, for sure.

I gotta hand it to my wife for making the decisions she made cause she had a lot more strength than I did. That’s the bottom line. If it wasn’t for her, my path would've been a lot different in life. So thanks to her for that kind of stability and backbone.


Posted by: Ghetto JuiceGhetto Juice at: 29 Oct 2013 18:19




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After Kolohe was born I had a rebirth of surfing success. When I was 30, I did really well and I won all the American stuff; the PSTAs, the WQS’s in Newport, the WQS’s in Virginia. I had a lot of competitive success later, but I had to because I had no other way to make money. It was gnarly. I was living paycheck to paycheck. If I would've been as smart and competitive and as sober at 18 as I was when I was 30, I would've been and could've been way better off. I spent a lot of money on stupid stuff and wasted a lot of time. And that’s the hard part. Sometimes you gotta learn on your own. Kolohe doesn’t spend his money on stupid stuff ….

I’ve been so blessed with my employers along the way. When I was doing the contests, say 25-30 years old, I was taking Kolohe with me everywhere. Then when I took a job with Oakley when he was 7 or 8, and he got good enough quick that they actually let me take him to Snapper (Rocks) every year, and boat trips and different things. And they were really cool to let him come with me and develop his skills while I did my job, so it was really really cool. And I had a lot of friends who were pro surfers, Shane Beschen, Andy Irons, all the guys would always be cruising at my house … so he’s always been immersed in the whole scene since a really young age. It’s been really cool.

For all the talent Kolohe has, he actually works a lot harder than people realize. He’s out there, more time in the water, he doesn’t party much. He might have a little party here and there, but he’s really focused and dedicated, and I think that’s what it comes down to. You see the separation in the paths. I think he was blessed with a huge amount of talent, though that was always apparent. But talent is only as good as it is without work, so if you combine the two, with dedication and hard work and sacrifice, with talent…. And now he knows he has to work even harder. The journey’s really just beginning for him, and I think he’s realizing that…

If Kolohe starts to get too cocky, or a little too arrogant, shit will happen to him. Like some people pay the piper down the line later, but Kolohe’s got a conscious, he feels it and it happens quick. No matter what when you’re 19 years old it’s really tough to keep a level head, and I’m really stoked he’s learning on his own to be humble… Kolohe’s got great friends around him, they’re a really great group of kids…. They don’t surf as much as him, which I think is a little bit of a bummer for him, cause he likes to surf a lot, and a lot of times, surfing alone ain’t that fun. But I tell him he’s got a purpose, and he has a vision. It’s hard to stay that frothed out when you start to look at other ways your life is going to take you….

Kolohe’s having fun. He’s on the world tour, he’s learning a lot. You know a while back he was injured for like three and a half months, and after an injury it takes a while to get back to normal, and I think, you know, he was a bit overzealous before the tour started that year, thinking he was gonna do certain things, and I think he got humbled, and learned a lot. I’m really proud of where he is mentally and physically right now. It’s a good time for him.

I just surfed Trestles with Kolohe the other day. It was unbelievable. I was really really stoked, cause there’s old school guys out there that were surfing there before me, and now my son’s surfing there with me, and you’re seeing fins, and upside down inverts, and big wraps going into the bay. It was a beautiful sunny day, you know, the water was glistening, and there were only like ten guys in the water. To be able to share that with my son is so cool, ‘cause there’s really nowhere like Lowers. You’d have to go to Northern California to experience that sort of vibe on the beach, and Kolohe has it five minutes from his house. I was telling him, ‘Dude, I told ya.” You know, the kids these days, they want a ramp, they want a closeout, and as soon as he realizes that if he waters that tree down there, the roots, and surfs down there, his surfing will go to another level, for sure.

I gotta hand it to my wife for making the decisions she made cause she had a lot more strength than I did. That’s the bottom line. If it wasn’t for her, my path would've been a lot different in life. So thanks to her for that kind of stability and backbone.

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