Courtney Conlogue Interview by Tim Stamps

COURTNEY_SQUARE.jpg

Orange County's Courtney Conlogue looks to have her sights set on a world title this year after an amazing win at the Drug Aware Margaret Pro that saw her throwing power gouges and in an absolute barrel hunt making this her 3rd career win on the CT.
Courtney’s ability to read the tricky conditions at Margaret River and complete control of her equipment showed in every heat. During the short break before the Brazil, we had the man behind her equipment, none other than Tim Stamps sit down with her to have a chat about the tour, her recent win and beyond.

TS: I’m sitting down with Courtney on her couch 3 days post the Australian leg of World Tour. Congratulations on your victory in WA at Margaret River. How did it feel?
CC: It felt amazing to finally win an event after the injury and all the obstacles I had to go through last year. During the first part of the Australian leg I was able to work out a couple kinks in my process and started getting a rhythm. Towards the end I felt I hit it on the bulls eye and was able to feel a good rhythm at Margaret’s.

TS: At Margaret’s the waves were pumping and you were on all the big sets and looked in control. How comfortable are you out there in that line up?
CC: I’ve definitely spent a lot of time out at Margaret’s. The first year I actually competed out there I was knocked out second round. I’ve been going out there for 7 years now. After that loss I surfed every afternoon with all the kite surfers, with stormy onshore waves, and 6’ to 8’ all to myself. I told myself I’m going to learn this break and figure it out. I learned what I had to do to get through heats. From that point it’s been a love/hate relationship with Margaret’s. Since then it’s turned into a love affair. I really understand the wave and it feels like a home break for me. I always love going back; it’s so beautiful with the vineyards too.

TS: Is this your third victory out there?
CC: Yeah

TS: You won back to back and then skipped two years which Carissa took those. Then you got it back.
CC: Yep, that’s it.

TS: Do you feel your power surfing style suits Margaret’s?
CC: Definitely. Power surfing and big waves are my forte. It’s what I love to do and I love riding bigger boards in the bigger conditions. Drawing nice big lines on an open canvas. I enjoy working such a large playing field and the spontaneity of Margaret’s. You’ll be sitting on the boil and it will be 8’. The next thing you know 10’ to 12’ sets will be coming in and you’re racing out the back to get them or not to get it on your head. I love the energy of the open water. The opportunity to push your turns and have them pushing back at you is amazing.

TS: What do you like about riding your bigger boards?
CC: Bigger waves and bigger boards will take you back to the fundamentals of surfing. Just big open lines and holding the rail.

TS: From watching the contest it feels like the right has a Sunset Beach, Hawaii type feel. Do you surf Sunset much and how would you compare the two?
CC: It has a similarity to Sunset but Sunset’s warmer water so it’s a bit softer. When you eat it at Margaret’s it hurts more because of the water density. On the right you have a slab of reef on your last turn and you don’t have that at Sunset. Every year going to Sunset in the winter definitely helps out with the big wave surfing.

TS: When you were on the road for almost three months in Australia, what support team did you have with you besides your Mom?
CC: I had a lot of support. This is my fifth year on tour so I’ve built families at every location I go. At Snapper I have Mark Richardson and Billabong’s headquarters are there. I always stay at the same apartment and now it just feels like home; Allison and Keith are super welcoming. When I go to Bells I always stay at the same spot and Georgina is like a second mom. That’s where I got injured last year. She was one of my cheerleaders throughout that whole event. Maurice Cole was also there as well and we had some great conversations. Max our contest director, who just retired, was like a dad to everyone at Bells. It’s been so great having him support women’s surfing. At Margaret’s I have Mal and my Jahava family who are always rooting for me. They are such kind hearts and really supportive. I have my super caddy, she’s from Gracetown, who is always there every year paddling out my back up board which is really crucial.

TS: Do you rely on any local knowledge at Margaret’s?
CC: Yes a little bit. Mal is a local that has been there as a sounding board. He has insight on the break, the swells, the tides, and what the wind’s doing. It just helps to give me that extra confidence.

TS: What are you going to do now that you’re home?
CC: I’m only home for a couple days… so sleep. I’m planting plants at my home, getting ready for the Molokai Paddleboard Race, getting my boards ready for Rio and switching suitcases.

TS: Where do you like to surf when you are home and with whom?
CC: Southside Huntington is my go to. I surf with you (Tim Stamps) a bit. Just the local guys too, Teddy and Brett. It’s always fun to run into Brett in the lineup and run a few little mock heats and try a battle out with scores.

TS: Who wins them?
CC: Me (giggles). I’d say it’s about even. I surf with my dad a lot because that never gets old.

TS: What’s your training outside of surfing?
CC: I do Zumba fitness (giggles). Today I actually paddled 12 miles to get ready for the Molokai race. I’m paddling several times a week. I’m getting into the gym working on some strength and power stuff and endurance for Fiji. Making sure I can hold that rail when I’m flying down the line.

TS: Who are your inspirations, besides me? (giggles)
CC: Secretariat. In1973 he became the first U.S. Triple Crown winner in 25 years. In one race he beat the other horses by 31 lengths. He was a sprinter horse and no one believed in him to go the distance. Another one is Apollo Ono; speed skater that has an inspiring story.

TS: What would you be doing if you weren’t a pro surfer?
CC: Design or architecture. I think buildings are fascinating and to be able to put design into a piece where someone lives or works is super cool.

TS: Where’s your favorite stop on the tour?
CC: Probably these three: Margaret’s, Honolulu Bay and Fiji. All for the waves and the swell. I like Trestles too because it’s at home.

TS: Was your last win as good as your first win?
CC: It’s hard to say. They are about the same because my first win was my second year on the tour and I felt like a freshman trying to figure out all the ropes. So that one was really sweet. It hasn’t lost its intensity because with each win there’s a lot of work to get to the top. Each win is fulfilling because it’s a huge process.

TS: What’s your daily routine when you are home?
CC: Rising early for a paddle or surf. Getting a surf and breakfast in before 10am is such a sweet feeling. I love to spend some time in my art studio painting and doing design.

TS: What kind of art do you do?
CC: It’s a little more abstract. Than paint any subject which can be a landscape or animal, etc. Lately I’ve been painting some pop art pieces.

TS: Do you have a special diet?
CC: I’ve been eating really healthy lately. My diet is based off how my body is feeling throughout the day. It’s a work in process trying to properly fuel myself. I love my steak but I don’t have it all the time. I’m trying to maintain the muscle and not bulk up. I’d like to stay a lighter lean athlete but with the same powerful push. When I return home the first thing I like to eat is a carne asada taco.

TS: What is your pre-heat process?
CC: I have a lot of energy. Just getting used to my surroundings and listening to the announcers, hearing what is going on and than having the capability of zoning it all out. I like the nerves before a competition. I also have to have my sunglasses off before a heat. I think you see things differently without sunglasses.

TS: What do you think is the most you’ve surfed in a day?
CC: Sun up to sun down was the most I’ve done. Probably a ten-hour surf day.

TS: What makes a board magic for you?
CC: The magic board allows you to not think about what you are doing. You just do it. The board responds like a glove. It’s good when you get a board like that because your confidence goes through the roof. You usually surf it until there is no push or pop left in them because they work so good.

TS: We know your family is really important to you. Is there anything you’d like to say to them?
CC: I have an awesome family. I’m a very lucky girl. My dad shared surfing with me so I wouldn’t be here today without him. He’s been very supportive of me and coached me throughout my amateur career. My brother and sister are phenomenal people who are always inspiring me. I look up to them. My Mom is my Sherpa. She’s my additional right and left arm. She’s been my support on the road for the past five years. She keeps me on my true path. I wouldn’t be as successful on the road without her.

TS: You are now off to Rio and I just want to say that I am really proud and honored to be a small piece of your puzzle in your campaign. Thanks for spending some time with me and everything you do.


Posted by: ghetto juiceghetto juice at: 19 May 2015 13:51




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Orange County's Courtney Conlogue looks to have her sights set on a world title this year after an amazing win at the Drug Aware Margaret Pro that saw her throwing power gouges and in an absolute barrel hunt making this her 3rd career win on the CT.
Courtney’s ability to read the tricky conditions at Margaret River and complete control of her equipment showed in every heat. During the short break before the Brazil, we had the man behind her equipment, none other than Tim Stamps sit down with her to have a chat about the tour, her recent win and beyond.

TS: I’m sitting down with Courtney on her couch 3 days post the Australian leg of World Tour. Congratulations on your victory in WA at Margaret River. How did it feel?
CC: It felt amazing to finally win an event after the injury and all the obstacles I had to go through last year. During the first part of the Australian leg I was able to work out a couple kinks in my process and started getting a rhythm. Towards the end I felt I hit it on the bulls eye and was able to feel a good rhythm at Margaret’s.

TS: At Margaret’s the waves were pumping and you were on all the big sets and looked in control. How comfortable are you out there in that line up?
CC: I’ve definitely spent a lot of time out at Margaret’s. The first year I actually competed out there I was knocked out second round. I’ve been going out there for 7 years now. After that loss I surfed every afternoon with all the kite surfers, with stormy onshore waves, and 6’ to 8’ all to myself. I told myself I’m going to learn this break and figure it out. I learned what I had to do to get through heats. From that point it’s been a love/hate relationship with Margaret’s. Since then it’s turned into a love affair. I really understand the wave and it feels like a home break for me. I always love going back; it’s so beautiful with the vineyards too.

TS: Is this your third victory out there?
CC: Yeah

TS: You won back to back and then skipped two years which Carissa took those. Then you got it back.
CC: Yep, that’s it.

TS: Do you feel your power surfing style suits Margaret’s?
CC: Definitely. Power surfing and big waves are my forte. It’s what I love to do and I love riding bigger boards in the bigger conditions. Drawing nice big lines on an open canvas. I enjoy working such a large playing field and the spontaneity of Margaret’s. You’ll be sitting on the boil and it will be 8’. The next thing you know 10’ to 12’ sets will be coming in and you’re racing out the back to get them or not to get it on your head. I love the energy of the open water. The opportunity to push your turns and have them pushing back at you is amazing.

TS: What do you like about riding your bigger boards?
CC: Bigger waves and bigger boards will take you back to the fundamentals of surfing. Just big open lines and holding the rail.

TS: From watching the contest it feels like the right has a Sunset Beach, Hawaii type feel. Do you surf Sunset much and how would you compare the two?
CC: It has a similarity to Sunset but Sunset’s warmer water so it’s a bit softer. When you eat it at Margaret’s it hurts more because of the water density. On the right you have a slab of reef on your last turn and you don’t have that at Sunset. Every year going to Sunset in the winter definitely helps out with the big wave surfing.

TS: When you were on the road for almost three months in Australia, what support team did you have with you besides your Mom?
CC: I had a lot of support. This is my fifth year on tour so I’ve built families at every location I go. At Snapper I have Mark Richardson and Billabong’s headquarters are there. I always stay at the same apartment and now it just feels like home; Allison and Keith are super welcoming. When I go to Bells I always stay at the same spot and Georgina is like a second mom. That’s where I got injured last year. She was one of my cheerleaders throughout that whole event. Maurice Cole was also there as well and we had some great conversations. Max our contest director, who just retired, was like a dad to everyone at Bells. It’s been so great having him support women’s surfing. At Margaret’s I have Mal and my Jahava family who are always rooting for me. They are such kind hearts and really supportive. I have my super caddy, she’s from Gracetown, who is always there every year paddling out my back up board which is really crucial.

TS: Do you rely on any local knowledge at Margaret’s?
CC: Yes a little bit. Mal is a local that has been there as a sounding board. He has insight on the break, the swells, the tides, and what the wind’s doing. It just helps to give me that extra confidence.

TS: What are you going to do now that you’re home?
CC: I’m only home for a couple days… so sleep. I’m planting plants at my home, getting ready for the Molokai Paddleboard Race, getting my boards ready for Rio and switching suitcases.

TS: Where do you like to surf when you are home and with whom?
CC: Southside Huntington is my go to. I surf with you (Tim Stamps) a bit. Just the local guys too, Teddy and Brett. It’s always fun to run into Brett in the lineup and run a few little mock heats and try a battle out with scores.

TS: Who wins them?
CC: Me (giggles). I’d say it’s about even. I surf with my dad a lot because that never gets old.

TS: What’s your training outside of surfing?
CC: I do Zumba fitness (giggles). Today I actually paddled 12 miles to get ready for the Molokai race. I’m paddling several times a week. I’m getting into the gym working on some strength and power stuff and endurance for Fiji. Making sure I can hold that rail when I’m flying down the line.

TS: Who are your inspirations, besides me? (giggles)
CC: Secretariat. In1973 he became the first U.S. Triple Crown winner in 25 years. In one race he beat the other horses by 31 lengths. He was a sprinter horse and no one believed in him to go the distance. Another one is Apollo Ono; speed skater that has an inspiring story.

TS: What would you be doing if you weren’t a pro surfer?
CC: Design or architecture. I think buildings are fascinating and to be able to put design into a piece where someone lives or works is super cool.

TS: Where’s your favorite stop on the tour?
CC: Probably these three: Margaret’s, Honolulu Bay and Fiji. All for the waves and the swell. I like Trestles too because it’s at home.

TS: Was your last win as good as your first win?
CC: It’s hard to say. They are about the same because my first win was my second year on the tour and I felt like a freshman trying to figure out all the ropes. So that one was really sweet. It hasn’t lost its intensity because with each win there’s a lot of work to get to the top. Each win is fulfilling because it’s a huge process.

TS: What’s your daily routine when you are home?
CC: Rising early for a paddle or surf. Getting a surf and breakfast in before 10am is such a sweet feeling. I love to spend some time in my art studio painting and doing design.

TS: What kind of art do you do?
CC: It’s a little more abstract. Than paint any subject which can be a landscape or animal, etc. Lately I’ve been painting some pop art pieces.

TS: Do you have a special diet?
CC: I’ve been eating really healthy lately. My diet is based off how my body is feeling throughout the day. It’s a work in process trying to properly fuel myself. I love my steak but I don’t have it all the time. I’m trying to maintain the muscle and not bulk up. I’d like to stay a lighter lean athlete but with the same powerful push. When I return home the first thing I like to eat is a carne asada taco.

TS: What is your pre-heat process?
CC: I have a lot of energy. Just getting used to my surroundings and listening to the announcers, hearing what is going on and than having the capability of zoning it all out. I like the nerves before a competition. I also have to have my sunglasses off before a heat. I think you see things differently without sunglasses.

TS: What do you think is the most you’ve surfed in a day?
CC: Sun up to sun down was the most I’ve done. Probably a ten-hour surf day.

TS: What makes a board magic for you?
CC: The magic board allows you to not think about what you are doing. You just do it. The board responds like a glove. It’s good when you get a board like that because your confidence goes through the roof. You usually surf it until there is no push or pop left in them because they work so good.

TS: We know your family is really important to you. Is there anything you’d like to say to them?
CC: I have an awesome family. I’m a very lucky girl. My dad shared surfing with me so I wouldn’t be here today without him. He’s been very supportive of me and coached me throughout my amateur career. My brother and sister are phenomenal people who are always inspiring me. I look up to them. My Mom is my Sherpa. She’s my additional right and left arm. She’s been my support on the road for the past five years. She keeps me on my true path. I wouldn’t be as successful on the road without her.

TS: You are now off to Rio and I just want to say that I am really proud and honored to be a small piece of your puzzle in your campaign. Thanks for spending some time with me and everything you do.

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